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Feature Channels: Behavioral Science

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Newswise: School suspensions and exclusions put vulnerable children at risk
Released: 14-Apr-2024 5:30 PM EDT
School suspensions and exclusions put vulnerable children at risk
University of South Australia

Managing problematic student behaviour is one of the most persistent, challenging, and controversial issues facing schools today. Yet despite best intentions to build a more inclusive and punitive-free education system, school suspensions and expulsions remain.

Released: 12-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
MSU research suggests darker side of being politically confident
Michigan State University

New research from Michigan State University suggests that those who feel self-confident about their political abilities are more likely to discriminate against those who hold opposing political views. And those who are more skeptical of their political abilities are more likely to treat other people fairly when they disagree politically.

Newswise: Aging adults stay home more, socialize less than pre-pandemic
Released: 10-Apr-2024 7:05 PM EDT
Aging adults stay home more, socialize less than pre-pandemic
University of Colorado Boulder

Four years after the U.S. began to slowly emerge from mandatory COVID-19 lockdowns, a study of 7,000 aging adults suggests that for many, life has never been the same.

Released: 9-Apr-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Teen Behavior, Explained by a Neuroscientist
Tufts University

A researcher at Tufts School of Medicine explains how brain development—as well as current events—can influence decision-making in adolescence.

     
Newswise: Eye Movement Study: 400-Year-Old Painting Holds Powerful Insights for Today’s Marketers
Released: 9-Apr-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Eye Movement Study: 400-Year-Old Painting Holds Powerful Insights for Today’s Marketers
New York Institute of Technology, New York Tech

An eye movement study led by a New York Institute of Technology psychology researcher suggests that techniques used in a Baroque-era painting could help today’s marketers catch the attention of modern consumers.

     
Released: 8-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Everyday social interactions predict language development in infants
University of Washington

In a study published April 8 in Current Biology, University of Washington researchers found that when the adult talked and played socially with a 5-month-old baby, the baby’s brain activity particularly increased in regions responsible for attention — and the level of this type of activity predicted enhanced language development at later ages.

Newswise: Your unsupportive partner is physically stressing you out, new research reveals
4-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Your unsupportive partner is physically stressing you out, new research reveals
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Couples feel more understood and cared for when their partners show positive support skills – and it’s evidenced by levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the body – according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

   
Newswise: UTEP Study: Prairie Voles Display Signs of Human-like Depression
Released: 4-Apr-2024 3:05 PM EDT
UTEP Study: Prairie Voles Display Signs of Human-like Depression
University of Texas at El Paso

In a study published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, UTEP researchers make the case that prairie voles, small rodents that are found throughout the central United States and Canada, can be effectively used as animal models to further the study of clinical depression.

Newswise: Talking Politics With Strangers Isn’t as Awful as You’d Expect, Research Suggests
Released: 3-Apr-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Talking Politics With Strangers Isn’t as Awful as You’d Expect, Research Suggests
Association for Psychological Science

Individuals underestimate the social connection they can make with a stranger who disagrees with them on contentious issues, a new research paper suggests.

Released: 1-Apr-2024 9:00 AM EDT
Mountainside Medical Center Enhances Behavioral Health Services with Acquisition from Envision Healthcare
Hackensack Meridian Health (Mountainside Medical Center)

Mountainside Medical Center proudly announces the successful acquisition of behavioral health providers from Envision Healthcare. This marks a significant milestone in the hospital’s commitment to meeting the evolving needs of patients and the community.

Released: 1-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Counseling Awareness Month Honors Professionals Who Foster Mental Health and Wellness
American Counseling Association

At a time when the need for mental health services in the U.S. is higher than ever, counselors play a key role in increasing access to and delivering mental health care.

Released: 29-Mar-2024 12:05 PM EDT
What Ohtani scandal means for his career, fans and team: U-M experts can comment
University of Michigan

University of Michigan experts are available to discuss the scandal involving Los Angeles Dodgers player Shohai Ohtani, the two-way sensation and two-time American League Most Valuable Player, and interpreter Ippei Mizuhara, who was fired for stealing $4.5 million from Ohtani's bank account to pay off gambling debts.

Released: 27-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
ACA Awards Recognize Achievement and Excellence in Professional Counseling
American Counseling Association

Counselors from across the United States are being honored for excellence in research, career and humanitarian achievement.

Newswise: Frank Ghinassi Named Chair of the National Association for Behavioral Healthcare Board of Trustees
Released: 26-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Frank Ghinassi Named Chair of the National Association for Behavioral Healthcare Board of Trustees
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Frank A. Ghinassi, president and chief executive of Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care and senior vice president of Behavioral Health Services at RWJBarnabas Health, has been named the 2024 chair of the board of trustees for the National Association for Behavioral Healthcare (NABH).

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Study Shows Negative Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Youth Minority Mental Health
Released: 26-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Study Shows Negative Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Youth Minority Mental Health
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Recent historical, political and public health events, most notably the COVID-19 pandemic, have collectively contributed to increased stress and mental health challenges among many groups of people — including adolescents in racial and ethnic minorities.

Newswise: 
Rutgers Health Professor Chosen as President-Elect of American Psychiatric Association
Released: 20-Mar-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Rutgers Health Professor Chosen as President-Elect of American Psychiatric Association
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Theresa Miskimen, clinical professor of psychiatry at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, has been named president-elect of the American Psychiatric Association.

Released: 19-Mar-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Report finds California's mental health crisis programs need consistent funding, community engagement
UC Davis Health

UC Davis health researchers evaluated California’s mental health crisis management and prevention programs. Their report identified gaps in the system and called for more sustainable programs and community collaborations to support people with mental illness.

Newswise:Video Embedded mackenzie-scott-s-yield-giving-announces-2-million-grant-to-south-bronx-s-health-people-to-expand-peer-to-peer-education-to-tackle-most-wide-spread-and-preventable-chronic-diseases-afflicting-residents-of-poor-and-minority-communities
VIDEO
Released: 19-Mar-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Mackenzie Scott’s Yield Giving Announces $2 Million Grant to South Bronx’s Health People to Expand Peer-to-Peer Education to Tackle Most Wide-Spread – and Preventable – Chronic Diseases Afflicting Residents of Poor and Minority Communities
Health People

Today, we’re excited to share that we’ve been selected to receive a $2million gift as an awardee of the Yield Giving Open Call. Our project was selected from among 6,353 applications from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico after a process of multiple levels of review, feedback, and diligence involving peer applicants and an external Evaluation Panel recruited for experience relevant to this cause. Health People is very grateful and excited to use these funds to develop our Community Training Institute, enabling us to effectively train other community groups across the city to implement peer-based chronic disease self-care and preventive education.

   
Released: 19-Mar-2024 10:00 AM EDT
Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation Awards Hackensack Meridian Health Foundation $10 Million Grant to Expand Adolescent Behavioral Health Services in New Jersey
Hackensack Meridian Health

Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation Awards Hackensack Meridian Health Foundation $10 Million Grant to Expand Adolescent Behavioral Health Services in New Jersey

Released: 18-Mar-2024 3:45 PM EDT
Two-Day Course Teaches Hospitals and Health Systems How to Address Unprofessionalism and Unsafe Behavior
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The Vanderbilt Health Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy (CPPA) will host a two-day, hands-on course in Nashville to equip hospital and health system leaders with strategies and tools to address unprofessionalism and create a safe, respectful and reliable environment inside their organizations.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 8:00 AM EDT
Breathe, don’t vent: Turning down the heat is key to managing anger
Ohio State University

Venting about a source of anger might feel good in the moment, but it’s not effective at reducing the rage, new research suggests.

Released: 15-Mar-2024 11:00 AM EDT
New Research in April: Colorectal Cancer, Kidney Health, OR Supply Costs, and More
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

The April issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS) features new research on topics ranging from colorectal cancer and social vulnerability to operating room supply costs, the rise in school shootings since 1970, and the impact of permitless open carry laws on suicide rates, among others.

   
Released: 15-Mar-2024 9:15 AM EDT
Study of Fatal and Nonfatal Shootings by Police Reveals Racial Disparities, Dispatch Risks
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions and Vanderbilt University found that an average of 1,769 people were injured annually in police shootings from 2015 to 2020, 55 percent of them or 979 people, fatally.

 
Newswise: Lessons from the pandemic: the trouble with working from home
Released: 13-Mar-2024 7:05 PM EDT
Lessons from the pandemic: the trouble with working from home
Universite de Montreal

Remember when COVID-19 hit, and suddenly everyone was working from home? Well, a team of researchers in Montreal and Paris decided to dig deeper into how this shift affected office workers during the pandemic.

Newswise: Women Leaders Who Have Broken Down Barriers: Global Politics Expert Reflects on Women’s History Month
Released: 12-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Women Leaders Who Have Broken Down Barriers: Global Politics Expert Reflects on Women’s History Month
Virginia Tech

Women’s History Month recognizes the achievements of women throughout the world. Virginia Tech political science expert Farida Jalalzai reflects on world leaders who are women, and how in recent years they’ve broken down barriers and expanded understandings of the roles of women in governance.

Newswise: When a team is less than the sum of its parts: tensions between individual and team wellbeing
Released: 12-Mar-2024 5:05 AM EDT
When a team is less than the sum of its parts: tensions between individual and team wellbeing
Aalto University

Individual wellbeing doesn’t always add up to team wellbeing – but reflection and open communication can help

   
Newswise: Consuming refined carbs might be linked to perceived facial attractiveness
28-Feb-2024 12:50 PM EST
Consuming refined carbs might be linked to perceived facial attractiveness
PLOS

Acute and chronic consumption of high-glycemic food was associated with lower attractiveness ratings, independent of factors such as BMI and age.

   
Newswise: Study Shows Differences in How Patients with Impulse Control Disorder Process Consequences
Released: 4-Mar-2024 8:00 AM EST
Study Shows Differences in How Patients with Impulse Control Disorder Process Consequences
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

In a new study, published online today in Scientific Reports, researchers found differences in how people with ICD process the consequences of their actions compared to those without ICD, both on and off medication.

Released: 1-Mar-2024 11:05 AM EST
A mental process that leads to putting off an unpleasant task
Ohio State University

Putting off a burdensome task may seem like a universal trait, but new research suggests that people whose negative attitudes tend to dictate their behavior in a range of situations are more likely to delay tackling the task at hand.

Newswise:Video Embedded your-back-hurts-there-s-physical-therapy-for-that
VIDEO
Released: 29-Feb-2024 3:20 PM EST
Your Back Hurts? There’s Physical Therapy for That
Tufts University

Tufts University School of Medicine physical therapist Kathryn Sawyer shares tips and tools to help people experiencing acute low back pain.

   
25-Feb-2024 8:00 PM EST
Similar Genetic Elements Underlie Vocal Learning in Bats, Whales, and Seals
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

In a paper in the prestigious journal Science to appear on Feb. 29, 2024, a multi-institutional team led by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and University of California at Berkeley found parts of the genome, both within genes and outside of them, that evolved and are associated with vocal learning across mammals. These elements have been linked to autism in humans.

Released: 29-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
University of West Florida Crowd Management Expert Writes Op-ed on Crowd Storming
University of West Florida

Court storming is a right of passage. So was paddling, wedgies, and other antics that we have decided as a society need to end. Maybe it is time to stop court/field storming. The following represent some insight from Professor Gil Fried of the University of West Florida (Professor and Interim Assistant Dean of the College of Business) who is often referred to as the Crowd Management Doctor.

Released: 29-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Parents, wealth, race drive girls’ chances to play sports
Ohio State University

The likelihood that a girl will participate in high school sports in the United States is driven not so much by individual choice, new research suggests. Instead, decisions made by parents, the wealth of one’s family and community, and racial dynamics matter.

15-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Study Reveals the Impact of Behavioral Health Disorders on Cancer Surgery Outcomes
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Researchers have discovered new insights into the relationship between cancer surgery outcomes and behavioral health disorders (BHDs), publishing their findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS).

Released: 28-Feb-2024 10:05 PM EST
Consumers empowered with the facts on dairy’s nutritional benefits buy and consume more dairy foods
Elsevier

Participants in a JDS Communications® study increased their purchasing and consumption of cheese, ice cream, milk, and yogurt by more than 20% after learning more about dairy nutrition.

Released: 28-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Improving children’s access to care could mitigate the health consequences of exposure to neighborhood violence
Boston Medical Center

A new collaborative study between Boston Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston Children’s Hospital, Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia finds exposure to neighborhood violence among children was associated with unmet health needs and increased acute care utilization.

Released: 27-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Teens benefit from "forest bathing" – even in cities
University of Waterloo

Youth mental health in urban environments is significantly better when more nature is incorporated into city design.

Newswise: New study links placental oxygen levels to fetal brain development
Released: 27-Feb-2024 7:05 PM EST
New study links placental oxygen levels to fetal brain development
University of Western Ontario (now Western University)

A new study shows oxygenation levels in the placenta, formed during the last three months of fetal development, are an important predictor of cortical growth (development of the outermost layer of the brain or cerebral cortex) and is likely a predictor of childhood cognition and behaviour.

Released: 27-Feb-2024 11:15 AM EST
Having Self-Control Leads to Power
University of California San Diego

New research from the UC San Diego Rady School of Management and Texas A&M University finds that having self-control is often what leads to power.

Newswise: Researchers overestimate their own honesty
Released: 26-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Researchers overestimate their own honesty
Linkoping University

The average researcher thinks they are better than their colleagues at following good research practice.

Newswise: Expanding Federal Programs May Help to Increase the Behavioral Health Workforce
Released: 23-Feb-2024 3:05 PM EST
Expanding Federal Programs May Help to Increase the Behavioral Health Workforce
Stony Brook University

In a new paper published in the American Psychiatric Association’s Psychiatric Services, Stony Brook University IDEA Fellow, Briana Last, PhD, and co-authors provide a comprehensive review of one federal policy that has been increasingly used to address the country’s behavioral health provider shortage crisis: loan repayment programs (LRPs).

Newswise: GW Research Explores How People Make a Snap Judgment About Unfamiliar Dogs
Released: 20-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
GW Research Explores How People Make a Snap Judgment About Unfamiliar Dogs
George Washington University

A new study by researchers at the George Washington University Primate Genomics Lab finds that even dogs’ faces provoke instant judgement from people who don’t know them.

   
Released: 19-Feb-2024 10:05 PM EST
Expressing Workplace Anger: Not the Way to Get Ahead
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Contrary to previous research suggesting that expressing anger in the workplace leads to higher status and positive outcomes, a new study by researchers from Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Princeton University found that expressing anger is not a catalyst for higher status in the workplace.

Released: 19-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Study reveals five common ways in which the health of homeless pet owners and their companions is improved
CABI Publishing

A rapid scoping review has been conducted which reveals five common ways in which the health of homeless pet owners and their companion animals is improved. Ten percent of homeless people keep pets. But little information exists on specific interventions.



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