天美传媒

Curated News: Journal of Experimental Medicine

Filters close
Newswise: Researchers identify new way to inhibit immune cells that drive allergic asthma
19-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Researchers identify new way to inhibit immune cells that drive allergic asthma
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, have discovered that a protein called Piezo1 prevents a type of immune cell in the lung from becoming hyperactivated by allergens.

Newswise: Newly identified yeast could prevent fungal infections by outcompeting rivals, study suggests
11-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Newly identified yeast could prevent fungal infections by outcompeting rivals, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have identified a yeast that could be used to prevent invasive candidiasis, a major cause of death in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The study, to be published March 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that the novel yeast lives harmlessly in the intestines of mice and humans and can displace the yeast responsible for candidiasis, Candida albicans.

Newswise: Turbocharging CRISPR to Understand How the Immune System Fights Cancer
Released: 29-Feb-2024 8:00 AM EST
Turbocharging CRISPR to Understand How the Immune System Fights Cancer
Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School scientists develop new CRISPR-based tool to study the immune function of genes. New gene-editing approach could optimize how scientists study the immune system’s role in cancer and other immune-mediated diseases.

Newswise: Study identifies new pathway to suppressing autoimmunity
25-Sep-2023 2:05 PM EDT
Study identifies new pathway to suppressing autoimmunity
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Hospital for Special Surgery Research Institute have uncovered new details about how the immune system prevents the production of antibodies that can recognize and damage the body’s own, healthy tissues. The study, to be published September 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also reveals how this process is impaired in autoimmune disorders such as systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus and suggests potential new strategies to treat these diseases.

Newswise: Treating NASH disease by removing cholesterol from macrophages using a unique supramolecule
Released: 19-Sep-2023 2:05 PM EDT
Treating NASH disease by removing cholesterol from macrophages using a unique supramolecule
Nagoya University

A research group from the Graduate School of Medicine and Research Institute of Environmental Medicine at Nagoya University reported that cholesterol accumulation in macrophages promotes liver fibrosis in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

Released: 24-Aug-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Training immune cells to remove ‘trash’ helps resolve lung inflammation
University of Illinois Chicago

Acute lung injury occurs when our lung’s immune system response becomes hyperactivated and causes inflammation to continue unchecked. In fact, many deaths from COVID-19 were from acute lung injury.

Newswise: Mutations in blood stem cells can exacerbate colon cancer
21-Aug-2023 9:45 AM EDT
Mutations in blood stem cells can exacerbate colon cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Florida College of Medicine have discovered how common age-related changes in the blood system can make certain colon cancers grow faster.

Newswise: Neuroscientists create new resource to improve Alzheimer’s disease research models
Released: 23-Aug-2023 7:30 AM EDT
Neuroscientists create new resource to improve Alzheimer’s disease research models
Indiana University

A new study by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers uses more genetically diverse mouse models to study the accumulation and spread of abnormal tau protein deposits in the brain.

Released: 3-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers Identify a New Mechanism, Cancer Hijacks Enzyme Substrate Motif Mutations
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Enzyme mutations have been of great interest to scientists who study cancer. Scientists in the Liu and Tan labs at UNC’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have been studying mutations of enzyme recognition motifs in substrates, which may more faithfully reflect enzyme function with the potential to find new targets or directions for cancer treatment.

Newswise: Researchers Use ‘Natural’ System to Identify Proteins Most Useful For Developing an Effective HIV Vaccine
Released: 30-May-2023 2:00 PM EDT
Researchers Use ‘Natural’ System to Identify Proteins Most Useful For Developing an Effective HIV Vaccine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists have spent years trying to develop an effective HIV vaccine, but none have proven successful. Based on findings from a recently published study, a Johns Hopkins Medicine-led research team may have put science one step closer to that goal.

Newswise: Researchers discover how some brain cells transfer material to neurons in mice
Released: 17-Apr-2023 3:35 PM EDT
Researchers discover how some brain cells transfer material to neurons in mice
UC Davis Health

A UC Davis study is the first to report on a material transfer mechanism from cells, known as oligodendrocytes, to neurons in the brain of a mouse model. This discovery opens new possibilities for understanding brain maturation and finding treatments for many neurological conditions.

   
Newswise: Study to decode microbe-gut signaling suggests potential new treatment for IBD
Released: 4-Apr-2023 1:00 PM EDT
Study to decode microbe-gut signaling suggests potential new treatment for IBD
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Fresh insights into how our bodies interact with the microbes living in our guts suggest that a two-drug combination may offer a new way to treat inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Newswise: Can Controlling Retinoic Acid be a Key to Preventing Infections in the Gut?
Released: 28-Mar-2023 1:55 PM EDT
Can Controlling Retinoic Acid be a Key to Preventing Infections in the Gut?
Stony Brook University

A team of scientists from the Renaissance School of Medicine (RSOM) at Stony Brook University have identified a distinct role of retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A, during the immune response of the gut.

Newswise: Insights into causes of rare genetic immune disorders
Released: 21-Mar-2023 3:55 PM EDT
Insights into causes of rare genetic immune disorders
Garvan Institute of Medical Research

The cellular glitches underlying a rare genetic disorder called activated PI3K Delta syndrome 2 (APDS2) have been identified by researchers at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research.

Newswise: 新的基因编辑技术成功地逆转小鼠的视力损失
13-Mar-2023 9:55 AM EDT
新的基因编辑技术成功地逆转小鼠的视力损失
The Rockefeller University Press

视网膜色素变性症是人类失明的主要原因之一。中国的研究人员成功地恢复了患有视网膜色素变性症的小鼠的视力。该研究将于摆叁月十七日闭发表在《实验医学杂志》上。该研究使用一种新型的、高度通用的颁搁滨厂笔搁基因组编辑技术,有潜力纠正各种导致疾病的遗传突变。

Newswise: New gene-editing technique reverses vision loss in mice
13-Mar-2023 9:55 AM EDT
New gene-editing technique reverses vision loss in mice
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have successfully restored the vision of mice with retinitis pigmentosa, one of the major causes of blindness in humans. The study, to be published March 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, uses a new, highly versatile form of CRISPR-based genome editing with the potential to correct a wide variety of disease-causing genetic mutations.

Released: 8-Mar-2023 5:50 PM EST
Research Highlights for February 2023
University of Utah Health

Read how researchers discovered genetic markers that hinder pancreatic cancer treatment and mutations that increase sarcoma risk. Then learn how artificial intelligence is helping predict prostate cancer outcomes and see how a new clinical trial looks at less-invasive breast cancer treatments. Finally, find out how a new grant could help veterans get the cancer care they need.

Newswise: A call for action mounts an emergent attack against invaders
Released: 15-Feb-2023 1:00 PM EST
A call for action mounts an emergent attack against invaders
Tokyo Medical and Dental University

An SOS signals a call for immediate action during an emergency to request a need for protection.

Released: 30-Jan-2023 12:45 PM EST
Study finds how our brains turn into smarter disease fighters
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Jan. 30, 2023 — Combating Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases by inserting healthy new immune cells into the brain has taken a leap toward reality. Neuroscientists at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to safely thwart the brain’s resistance to them, vaulting a key hurdle in the quest.

Newswise: Mouse study suggests new therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors
Released: 19-Dec-2022 10:20 AM EST
Mouse study suggests new therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York have discovered that common cancer treatments, such as radiotherapy or anthracycline drugs, cause long-term damage to heart tissue by activating a key inflammatory signaling pathway. The study, published December 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that inhibiting this pathway could reduce the chances of cancer survivors suffering heart disease later in life.

16-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST
MD Anderson Research Highlights for November 16, 2022
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a promising targeted therapy combination for patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a link between the gut microbiome and therapy-related neutropenic fever, a novel therapeutic target for immunotherapy-related colitis, a telementoring model for training providers on cervical cancer prevention in limited-resource areas, a new understanding of the prognostic value of RUNX1 mutations in AML, and insights into the effects of opioid use on the pain sensitivity pathway.

   
3-Nov-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Researchers Offer Roadmap for Identifying New Neuroprotective Treatments by Leveraging Sex Differences
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Sex differences in the aging brain may offer an enticing clue for researching more effective neuroprotective treatments, according to a new treatment development strategy laid out by UCLA researchers.

Newswise: October Research Highlights
Released: 31-Oct-2022 3:40 PM EDT
October Research Highlights
Cedars-Sinai

A Roundup of the Latest Medical Discoveries and Faculty News at Cedars-Sinai

Newswise: Severe COVID-19 caused by “senile” interferon response in older patients, researchers suggest
Released: 21-Sep-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Severe COVID-19 caused by “senile” interferon response in older patients, researchers suggest
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered that age-dependent impairments in antiviral interferon proteins underlie the increased susceptibility of older patients to severe COVID-19. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that aged mice infected with SARS-CoV-2 are protected from severe disease by treatment with one of these interferons, IFN-γ.

Newswise: A Consistent Lack of Sleep Negatively Impacts Immune Stem Cells, Increasing Risk of Inflammatory Disorders and Heart Disease
20-Sep-2022 8:05 AM EDT
A Consistent Lack of Sleep Negatively Impacts Immune Stem Cells, Increasing Risk of Inflammatory Disorders and Heart Disease
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai study also shows catching up on sleep doesn’t reverse possible negative effects on cellular level

Newswise: Anti-sedative could alleviate cancer therapy side effects, study suggests
Released: 20-Sep-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Anti-sedative could alleviate cancer therapy side effects, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered that inhibiting a protein called the GABAA receptor can protect intestinal stem cells from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The study, published September 20 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that the FDA-approved anti-sedative flumazenil, which targets GABAA receptors, could alleviate some of the common gastrointestinal side effects, such as diarrhea and vomiting, induced by many cancer treatments.

Newswise: Boosting neuron formation restores memory in mice with Alzheimer’s disease
12-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Boosting neuron formation restores memory in mice with Alzheimer’s disease
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered that increasing the production of new neurons in mice with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) rescues the animals’ memory defects. The study, to be published August 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that new neurons can incorporate into the neural circuits that store memories and restore their normal function, suggesting that boosting neuron production could be a viable strategy to treat AD patients.

Newswise: Stanford Cancer Team Halts Growth of Multiple Myeloma and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in Mice with Custom Molecule sBCMA-Fc V3
20-Jul-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Stanford Cancer Team Halts Growth of Multiple Myeloma and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in Mice with Custom Molecule sBCMA-Fc V3
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Stanford University have developed “decoy receptor” molecules that inhibit the growth of both multiple myeloma (MM) and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in mice. The molecules, described in a study to be published July 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), were also found to be nontoxic in monkeys, suggesting they could be used to treat humans with either of these deadly diseases, which are two of the most common blood cancers around the world.

Newswise: UTSW researchers show effectiveness of migraine drug in weight loss
Released: 11-Jul-2022 3:05 PM EDT
UTSW researchers show effectiveness of migraine drug in weight loss
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Triptans, a commonly prescribed class of migraine drugs, may also be useful in treating obesity, a new study by scientists at UT Southwestern suggests. In studies on obese mice, a daily dose of a triptan led animals to eat less food and lose weight over the course of a month, the team reported in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Released: 17-Jun-2022 3:10 PM EDT
COVID-19: Identification of broadly SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies
Institut Pasteur

Although the different SARS-CoV-2 variants currently in circulation are undoubtedly less severe in vaccinated individuals in the general population, immunocompromised people are at greater risk of developing severe forms of COVID-19.

Newswise: Broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide immunity against SARS-CoV-2 variants
Released: 15-Jun-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide immunity against SARS-CoV-2 variants
The Rockefeller University Press

Two broadly neutralizing antibodies show great promise to provide long-acting immunity against COVID-19 in immunocompromised populations according to a paper published June 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The antibodies were effective against all SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern tested and could be used alone or in an antibody cocktail to diminish the risk of infection.

Newswise: Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly
Released: 9-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

To treat and prevent these diseases, researchers need to understand why a lack of oxygen would affect the immune system.

Newswise: Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
15-Mar-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
The Rockefeller University Press

A research group led by Kazunobu Sawamoto, a professor at Nagoya City University and National Institute for Physiological Sciences, and Chihiro Kurematsu, a student at Nagoya City University School of Medicine, has elucidated the mechanism that controls synaptic pruning of new neurons in the adult brain. These findings are expected to be useful in the study of neurological diseases with abnormalities in microglia and synapses, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

   
Newswise: Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
3-Mar-2022 10:30 AM EST
Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large amounts of ferrous iron and that this “ferroaddiction” can be exploited to specifically deliver powerful anticancer drugs without harming normal, healthy cells. The therapeutic strategy, described in a study to be published March 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could be used to treat a wide variety of cancers driven by mutations in the KRAS gene.

23-Feb-2022 3:15 PM EST
New way viruses trigger autoimmunity discovered
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that roseolovirus can trigger autoimmunity in a previously unknown way: by disrupting the process by which immune cells learn to avoid targeting their own body's cells and tissues.

Newswise: Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
19-Jan-2022 11:05 AM EST
Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
The Rockefeller University Press

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene that result in the malformation and overgrowth of various parts of the body. A new report to be published January 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) describes the successful treatment of two young infants with PROS using the breast cancer drug alpelisib.

Released: 2-Dec-2021 2:15 PM EST
Immune cells in the brain play key role in relationship between gut microbes and beta-amyloid
University of Chicago Medical Center

Perturbing the gut microbiome with antibiotics during early life leads to a reduction in amyloid plaques in male mice in adulthood — and microglia are a critical component of the effect.

Newswise: Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
Released: 1-Dec-2021 10:25 AM EST
Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
The Rockefeller University Press

USC study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that experimental drug protects against injury caused by tiny blood clots in the brain’s white matter, which can accumulate over time and lead to cognitive decline

Newswise: By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
Released: 23-Nov-2021 10:00 AM EST
By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
The Rockefeller University Press

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state in which they are unable to proliferate. The study, published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments that prevent the recurrence or spread of various cancer types, including breast cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

Released: 10-Nov-2021 10:30 AM EST
Yale researchers develop RNA-based therapy that clears SARS-CoV-2 from mice
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, as well as providing an inexpensive therapeutic option for developing countries that currently lack access to vaccines.

Newswise: Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
6-Oct-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can neutralize not only SARS-CoV-2 but a broad range of other coronaviruses as well. If successfully translated to humans, the approach, to be published October 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could lead to the development of a next-generation vaccine capable of preventing future coronavirus pandemics.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Cell-Analysis Technique Could Combat Tuberculosis
Cornell University

Researchers at Cornell have developed a way to analyze how individual immune cells react to the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. It could pave the way for new vaccine strategies and provide insights into fighting other infectious diseases.

14-Jul-2021 10:15 AM EDT
Researchers Reverse Emphysema in Mice by Injecting Blood Vessel Wall Cells
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian in New York have discovered that injecting mice with pulmonary endothelial cells—the cells that line the walls of blood vessels in the lung—can reverse the symptoms of emphysema. The study, which will be published July 21 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may lead to new treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an inflammatory lung disease associated with smoking that is thought to be the third leading cause of death worldwide.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Common cold combats COVID-19
Yale University

Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the virus which causes COVID-19, Yale researchers have found.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Collaboration controls killers
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude immunologists are researching how effector and killer T cells can be controlled to destroy cancer cells that resist treatment.

Released: 26-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Head and neck cancer cells hijack nearby healthy tissue, promoting further invasion of cancer cells
University of Michigan

Up to half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma will experience tumor recurrence or new tumors—tumors that often spread and are difficult to treat.

Released: 12-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify Source of Weight Gain From Antipsychotics
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 12, 2021 – Scientists with UT Southwestern’s Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute have identified the molecular mechanism that can cause weight gain for those using a common antipsychotic medication. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest new ways to counteract the weight gain, including a drug recently approved to treat genetic obesity, according to the study, which involved collaborations with scientists at UT Dallas and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.

Released: 10-May-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Controlling Cholesterol in Microglia Alleviates Chronic Pain, Opioid-Free
UC San Diego Health

Using a mouse model, researchers discover pivotal role of cholesterol in chronic pain often caused by chemotherapy, and propose novel therapy.


Showing results 1 – 50 of 183


close
1.2441