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Released: 16-May-2024 8:00 AM EDT
Rutgers Health Researchers Profile Clinical, Gene and Protein Changes in ‘Brain Fog’ From Long COVID
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Rutgers Health researchers found that long COVID is associated with active inflammatory changes in the nervous system, but the condition is distinct from Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

Newswise: New Study Shows Certain Combinations of Antiviral Proteins Are Responsible for Lupus Symptoms and Affect Treatment Outcomes
Released: 13-May-2024 11:30 AM EDT
New Study Shows Certain Combinations of Antiviral Proteins Are Responsible for Lupus Symptoms and Affect Treatment Outcomes
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have uncovered insights as to why lupus symptoms and severity present differently in individuals with the autoimmune condition, which affects up to 1.5 million Americans.

Newswise: Massive study identifies new biomarkers for renal cancer subtypes, improving diagnosis and— eventually—treatment
Released: 6-May-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Massive study identifies new biomarkers for renal cancer subtypes, improving diagnosis and— eventually—treatment
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study led by University of Michigan Health Rogel Cancer Center researchers identifies novel biomarkers in renal cell carcinomas.

1-May-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Synchronisation between the central circadian clock and the circadian clocks of tissues preserves their functioning and prevents ageing
Fundació Institut de Recerca Biomèdica (IRB BARCELONA)

• Two complementary research articles, published simultaneously in the journals Science and Cell Stem Cell by a team of scientists from the UPF and IRB Barcelona, reveal that central and peripheral circadian clocks coordinate to regulate the daily activity of skin and muscles. • The coordination between the two clocks (central and peripheral) guarantees 50% of the circadian functions of tissues, including vital processes such as the cell cycle, DNA repair, mitochondrial activity, and metabolism. • Synchronisation between the central brain clock and peripheral ones prevents premature muscle ageing and improves muscle function, suggesting new strategies to tackle age-related decline through circadian rhythm modulation.

29-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Identify Causal Genetic Variant Linked to Common Childhood Obesity
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have identified a causal genetic variant strongly associated with childhood obesity. The study provides new insight into the importance of the hypothalamus of the brain and its role in common childhood obesity and the target gene may serve as a druggable target for future therapeutic interventions.

Newswise: Cancer cell–immune cell interactions predict immunotherapy response
Released: 29-Apr-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Cancer cell–immune cell interactions predict immunotherapy response
UT Southwestern Medical Center

By examining which genes were turned on and off in a mix of cell types from breast cancer biopsies, a team led by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers developed a tool that can accurately predict which patients with breast cancer will respond to immunotherapies.

Newswise: Genetic hope in fight against devastating wheat disease
Released: 25-Apr-2024 9:05 PM EDT
Genetic hope in fight against devastating wheat disease
University of Adelaide

Fungal disease Fusarium head blight (FHB) is on the rise due to increasingly humid conditions induced by climate change during the wheat growing season, but a fundamental discovery by University of Adelaide researchers could help reduce its economic harm.

Newswise: Scientists Discover a New Signaling Pathway and Design a Novel Drug for Liver Fibrosis
Released: 25-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Scientists Discover a New Signaling Pathway and Design a Novel Drug for Liver Fibrosis
University of California San Diego

Scientists from the University of California San Diego discovered a novel signaling pathway in liver cells, leading to a treatment for fibrosis.

Released: 24-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
After spinal cord injury, neurons wreak havoc on metabolism
Ohio State University

Conditions such as diabetes, heart attack and vascular diseases commonly diagnosed in people with spinal cord injuries can be traced to abnormal post-injury neuronal activity that causes abdominal fat tissue compounds to leak and pool in the liver and other organs, a new animal study has found.

Newswise: Innovative Microscopy Demystifies Metabolism of Alzheimer’s
Released: 23-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Innovative Microscopy Demystifies Metabolism of Alzheimer’s
University of California San Diego

Using state-of-the-art microscopy techniques developed on campus, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have shed new light on the underlying mechanisms driving Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: Scientists identify cell vulnerability ‘fingerprint’ related to Parkinson’s, Lewy body dementia
Released: 16-Apr-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Scientists identify cell vulnerability ‘fingerprint’ related to Parkinson’s, Lewy body dementia
Van Andel Institute

A new study offers a first look into the complex molecular changes that occur in brain cells with Lewy bodies, which are key pathological hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease and some dementias.

Newswise: Developing Research into Mpox Infections
Released: 16-Apr-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Developing Research into Mpox Infections
Tufts University

The Martinot Lab at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, where faculty and students have been researching the mpox virus in endometrial tissues to raise awareness of the potential increased risk of mpox virus for women.

Newswise: Unlocking the ‘chain of worms’
Released: 15-Apr-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Unlocking the ‘chain of worms’
Washington University in St. Louis

Biologist B. Duygu Özpolat at Washington University in St. Louis and colleagues published a single-cell atlas for a highly regenerative annelid worm. This research may help inform stem cell technologies and regenerative medicine down the line.

Newswise: Cell’s ‘Garbage Disposal’ May Have Another Role: Helping Neurons Near Skin Sense the Environment
Released: 12-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Cell’s ‘Garbage Disposal’ May Have Another Role: Helping Neurons Near Skin Sense the Environment
Johns Hopkins Medicine

The typical job of the proteasome, the garbage disposal of the cell, is to grind down proteins into smaller bits and recycle some of those bits and parts. That’s still the case, for the most part, but, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, studying nerve cells grown in the lab and mice, say that the proteasome’s role may go well beyond that.

Newswise: NUS scientists uncover a missing link between poor diet and higher cancer risk
Released: 11-Apr-2024 10:05 PM EDT
NUS scientists uncover a missing link between poor diet and higher cancer risk
National University of Singapore (NUS)

A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has unearthed new findings which may help explain the connection between cancer risk and poor diet, as well as common diseases like diabetes, which arise from poor diet.

Newswise: Tiny brain bubbles carry complete codes
Released: 9-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Tiny brain bubbles carry complete codes
Sanford Burnham Prebys

In findings published in Cell Reports, senior author Jerold Chun, M.D., Ph.D., and team also discovered that the biological instructions within these vesicles differed significantly in postmortem brain samples donated from patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: UC Irvine-led research team builds first tandem repeat expansions genetic reference maps
Released: 8-Apr-2024 6:05 AM EDT
UC Irvine-led research team builds first tandem repeat expansions genetic reference maps
University of California, Irvine

A research team led by the University of California, Irvine has built the first genetic reference maps for short lengths of DNA repeated multiple times which are known to cause more than 50 lethal human diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and multiple cancers.

Newswise: Researchers Reveal Evolutionary Path of Important Proteins
Released: 29-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Researchers Reveal Evolutionary Path of Important Proteins
University of Wisconsin–Madison

New research from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decodes the evolutionary pathway of regulatory proteins, the molecules that help control gene expression.The findings from the Raman Lab in the Department of Biochemistry recently published their findings in the journal Cell Systems.

Newswise: Research Demonstrates that Cells Multitask in Bacterial Biofilms
Released: 26-Mar-2024 7:05 PM EDT
Research Demonstrates that Cells Multitask in Bacterial Biofilms
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory - EMSL

A team of scientists led an experimental study to determine the relationships between subpopulations of cells within the biofilm of a model microbe, revealing new insights regarding their potential.

Released: 26-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Genetically engineered dendritic cells enhance the power of immunotherapy against lung cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The results of a UCLA study suggest that using CXCL9 and CXCL10-producing dendritic cells alongside immunotherapy can be a promising strategy to overcome treatment resistance and improve clinical outcomes for patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

18-Mar-2024 9:00 AM EDT
Study suggests statins could help fight gum disease
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

A new study conducted in cell cultures showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs help to dampen the inflammation associated with periodontal disease by altering the behavior of macrophages, a type of immune cell.

Newswise: Scientists Find Core Regulatory Circuit Controlling Identity of Aggressive Leukemia
Released: 21-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Scientists Find Core Regulatory Circuit Controlling Identity of Aggressive Leukemia
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found a small set of proteins that maintain anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) identity, representing potential future therapeutic targets.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 12:05 PM EDT
WashU engineers manage a first: measuring pH in cell condensates
Washington University in St. Louis

In a first for the condensate field, researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, figured out how nucleolar sub-structures are assembled.

Newswise: We Now Know Why Killer T Cells Lose Energy Inside of Solid Tumors
Released: 15-Mar-2024 11:05 AM EDT
We Now Know Why Killer T Cells Lose Energy Inside of Solid Tumors
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that a metabolic enzyme called Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase causes T cells to store fat when they are in solid tumors, rather than burning fat for energy.

Newswise: Vac to the future
Released: 14-Mar-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Vac to the future
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

“We are hoping to use this competition not just as a way to examine the capacity of people to predict vaccination outcomes, but also as a way to address an important public health question,” says Peters.

Newswise: RNA-Based Therapy Shows Promise Against Aggressive Childhood Brain Tumors in Mice
Released: 13-Mar-2024 10:00 AM EDT
RNA-Based Therapy Shows Promise Against Aggressive Childhood Brain Tumors in Mice
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Targeting a non-encoding stretch of RNA may help shrink tumors caused by an aggressive type of brain cancer in children, according to new research in mice reported March 8 in Cell Reports by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators.

Newswise: “Molecular Rosetta Stone” Reveals How our Microbiome Talks to Us
Released: 11-Mar-2024 8:10 AM EDT
“Molecular Rosetta Stone” Reveals How our Microbiome Talks to Us
University of California San Diego

Researchers from Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science at the University of California San Diego have uncovered thousands of previously unknown bile acids, a type of molecule used by our gut microbiome to communicate with the rest of the body.

Newswise: Iron Restriction Keeps Blood Stem Cells Young
Released: 8-Mar-2024 11:05 AM EST
Iron Restriction Keeps Blood Stem Cells Young
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

As we age, our hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem cells (HSCs) become less able to produce new red and white blood cells and other vital blood components—contributing to chronic inflammation and accelerating the onset of blood cancers and degenerative diseases.

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This news release is embargoed until 4-Mar-2024 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 28-Feb-2024 7:05 AM EST

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Newswise: ‘Gene of Prejudice’ Demystifies Autism
Released: 28-Feb-2024 4:00 PM EST
‘Gene of Prejudice’ Demystifies Autism
University of California San Diego

Individuals with Williams syndrome have a gregarious “cocktail party” personality, while those with the opposite genetic alteration, in contrast, tend to have autistic traits and are prone to struggle socially. Research from UC San Diego sheds new light on the gene responsible.

Newswise: How an experimental drug reverses fatty liver disease
Released: 28-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
How an experimental drug reverses fatty liver disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A drug in clinical trials as a treatment for metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) works with a one-two punch that shuts down triglyceride production and fatty acid synthesis in liver cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers show in a new study.

Newswise: cells-13-00077-ag.png?1703905384
Released: 28-Feb-2024 3:05 AM EST
Biochemists discover what affects the development of autoimmune diseases
Scientific Project Lomonosov

The biochemist of RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry was the first to study how variants of the protein that controls T-lymphocytes affect the development of autoimmune diseases using the example of multiple sclerosis. This will help find new approaches to the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

Released: 27-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
First DNA study of ancient Eastern Arabians reveals malaria adaptation - study
University of Birmingham

People living in ancient Eastern Arabia appear to have developed resistance to malaria following the appearance of agriculture in the region around five thousand years ago, a new study reveals.

Newswise: How gut bacteria become ‘persisters’ to avoid antibiotics
Released: 27-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
How gut bacteria become ‘persisters’ to avoid antibiotics
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A subpopulation of gut bacteria given a commonly used antibiotic became "persisters" that were able to survive without developing true resistance, UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists discovered. Their findings, published in Cell Host & Microbe, could lead to better ways to fight bacterial infections.

Newswise: Roswell Park Study First to Show Two-Drug Combination Selectively Targets p53-Mutant Cancers
Released: 26-Feb-2024 11:30 AM EST
Roswell Park Study First to Show Two-Drug Combination Selectively Targets p53-Mutant Cancers
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A preclinical study led by a team of researchers at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center highlights the potential of a novel two-drug treatment strategy targeting p53-mutant cancers.

Newswise: UT Southwestern finds genetic clues to complex infections
Released: 26-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
UT Southwestern finds genetic clues to complex infections
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Treating complex bacterial infections with customized therapies tailored to the infection and the patient is closer to reality, thanks to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Released: 23-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Researchers explore whether gut microbes cause some COVID-19 patients to have higher blood clot risk
Cell Press

A gut microbial metabolite called 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine (2MBC) plays a role in exacerbating thrombosis -- the formation of blood clots – researchers report February 23rd in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Newswise: UT Southwestern study shows glucagon is key for kidney health
Released: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
UT Southwestern study shows glucagon is key for kidney health
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Glucagon, a hormone best known for promoting blood sugar production in the liver, also appears to play a key role in maintaining kidney health. When UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers removed receptors for this hormone from mouse kidneys, the animals developed symptoms akin to chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Newswise: ‘Dynamic duo’ defenses in bacteria ward off viral threats
Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
‘Dynamic duo’ defenses in bacteria ward off viral threats
University of Southampton

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that bacteria can pair up their defense systems to create a formidable force, greater than the sum of its parts, to fight off attack from phage viruses.

Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
A third of trans masculine individuals on testosterone ovulate
Amsterdam UMC

"Trans masculine people are people born female but do not identify as such, for example they feel male, gender fluid or non-binary. Our examination of their ovarian tissue shows that 33% of them show signs of recent ovulation, despite being on testosterone and no longer menstruating," says Joyce Asseler, PhD candidate at Amsterdam UMC.

Newswise: Study Details Toxic Elements Found in Stranded Whales, Dolphins Over 15 Years
Released: 21-Feb-2024 8:30 AM EST
Study Details Toxic Elements Found in Stranded Whales, Dolphins Over 15 Years
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers evaluated the prevalence, concentration and tissue distribution of essential and non-essential trace elements, including heavy metal toxicants in tissue (blubber, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, skin) and fecal samples. Findings reveal how toxicant levels relate to their sex, breed, age and other demographic factors.

Newswise: Media Tip: A new blueprint for designing high-performance batteries
Released: 20-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Media Tip: A new blueprint for designing high-performance batteries
Argonne National Laboratory

A team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have discovered an intriguing ​“cooperative” behavior among components in batteries that points to an exciting new approach to designing next-generation technologies. The team found that combining two different types of anions, negatively charged ions, with cations, positively charged ions, can significantly improve the overall battery’s performance.

Newswise: Ancient retroviruses played a key role in the evolution of vertebrate brains
Released: 15-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Ancient retroviruses played a key role in the evolution of vertebrate brains
Cell Press

Researchers report in the journal Cell that ancient viruses may be to thank for myelin—and, by extension, our large, complex brains.

Released: 15-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Do sugar-free candy and gum give you gas? Researchers think they know why
UC Davis Health

Scientists at the UC Davis School of Medicine may have figured out why some people have trouble digesting sorbitol, a sugar alcohol used in sugar-free gum, mints, candy and other products.

Newswise: Discovery of a subset of human short introns that are spliced out by a novel mechanism
Released: 14-Feb-2024 10:05 PM EST
Discovery of a subset of human short introns that are spliced out by a novel mechanism
Fujita Health University

Researchers confirm that the established pre-mRNA splicing mechanism that appears in textbooks cannot work in a subset of human short introns: A novel SAP30BP–RBM17 complex-dependent splicing has been uncovered.

Newswise: Satellites unveil the size and nature of the world’s coral reefs
Released: 13-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Satellites unveil the size and nature of the world’s coral reefs
University of Queensland

University of Queensland-led research has shown there is more coral reef area across the globe than previously thought, with detailed satellite mapping helping to conserve these vital ecosystems.

Released: 9-Feb-2024 4:05 PM EST
New strategy for safer CAR T cell therapy in lymphomas
University of Cologne

In the treatment of aggressive lymphomas and blood cancer (leukaemia), so-called chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR T cells) are increasingly being used.

Newswise: New process allows full recovery of starting materials from tough polymer composites
Released: 8-Feb-2024 2:20 PM EST
New process allows full recovery of starting materials from tough polymer composites
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

In a win for chemistry, inventors at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have designed a closed-loop path for synthesizing an exceptionally tough carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer and later recovering all of its starting materials.

Released: 8-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
Pharmacological inhibitor protects nerve cells in ALS disease
Newswise Review

A new pharmacological inhibitor can intervene in a central cell death mechanism that is responsible for the death of motor neurons and hence important for the progression of the motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).



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