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Newswise: Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in US Federally Qualified Health Centers
Released: 29-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in US Federally Qualified Health Centers
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

A national study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center found major gaps in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening use in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in the US, relative to overall screening rates in the country.

Newswise: Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in U.S. Federally Qualified Health Centers
26-Apr-2024 4:00 PM EDT
Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in U.S. Federally Qualified Health Centers
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

A national study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center found major gaps in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening use in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in the U.S., relative to overall screening rates in the country.

26-Apr-2024 9:05 AM EDT
The Aspirin Conundrum: Navigating Negative Results, Age, Aging Dynamics and Equity
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University

A new study examining the role of aspirin in breast cancer treatment reveals critical issues related to health equity and aging that have broad implications for cancer and other disease intervention trials, say researchers from Georgetown University’s Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Newswise: Homelessness a Major Issue for Many Patients in the Emergency Department
26-Apr-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Homelessness a Major Issue for Many Patients in the Emergency Department
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Housing insecurity is an issue for 1 in 20 patients who go to emergency departments at major medical centers in the Southeast, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published in JAMA Network Open.

25-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Undocumented Latinx patients got COVID-19 vaccine at same rate as U.S. citizens
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For undocumented Latinx patients who sought care in the emergency room during the pandemic, the reported rate of having received the COVID-19 vaccine was found to be the same as U.S. citizens, a new UCLA Health study found.

Newswise: Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Led to Some, But Not Many, Developmental Milestone Delays in Infants and Young Children
18-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Led to Some, But Not Many, Developmental Milestone Delays in Infants and Young Children
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Infants and children 5 years old and younger experienced only “modest” delays in developmental milestones due to the COVID-19 pandemic disruptions and restrictions, a study led by Johns Hopkins Children’s Center finds.

16-Apr-2024 3:00 PM EDT
New urine-based test detects high-grade prostate cancer, helping men avoid unnecessary biopsies
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have developed a new urine-based test that addresses a major problem in prostate cancer: how to separate the slow-growing form of the disease unlikely to cause harm from more aggressive cancer that needs immediate treatment.

Released: 15-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
From Opioid Overdose to Treatment Initiation: Outcomes Associated with Peer Support in Emergency Departments
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers Health researchers publish largest study on outcomes associated with hospital-based peer support programs after opioid overdose

Newswise: Study Reveals AI Enhances Physician-Patient Communication
Released: 15-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Study Reveals AI Enhances Physician-Patient Communication
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine study shows that AI enhances physician-patient communication.

Released: 12-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Young-Onset Dementia Tied to New Risk Factors
Alzheimer's Center at Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine

“Are the risk factors for early onset Alzheimer’s the same as late onset?” asks Domenico PraticĂČ, MD, the Scott Richards North Star Foundation Chair for Alzheimer’s Research, Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and Microbiology, and Director of the Alzheimer’s Center at Temple (ACT), at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM)

8-Apr-2024 3:05 PM EDT
‘Deaths of despair’ among Black Americans surpassed those of white Americans in 2022
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new analysis by researchers at UCLA Health found that mortality rates of middle-aged Black Americans caused by the “deaths of despair” -- suicide, drug overdose and alcoholic liver disease – surpassed the rate of white Americans in 2022.

Newswise: Living Near Green Space Associated With Fewer Emotional Problems in Preschool-Age Kids, NIH Study Finds
Released: 9-Apr-2024 12:30 PM EDT
Living Near Green Space Associated With Fewer Emotional Problems in Preschool-Age Kids, NIH Study Finds
Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes NIH

Children who live in areas with natural spaces (e.g., forests, parks, backyards) from birth may experience fewer emotional issues between the ages of 2 and 5, according to a study funded by the NIH Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program.

   
Newswise: Nurses Cite Employer Failures as their Top Reason for Leaving
8-Apr-2024 12:00 PM EDT
Nurses Cite Employer Failures as their Top Reason for Leaving
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) – published in JAMA Network Open today – showed that, aside from retirements, poor working conditions are the leading reasons nurses leave healthcare employment.

Released: 8-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Novo estudo descobre que tumores de cĂąncer de mama triplo-negativos com um aumento nas cĂ©lulas imunes tiveram menor risco de recorrĂȘncia apĂłs cirurgia, mesmo quando nĂŁo houve tratamento com quimioterapia
Mayo Clinic

Um novo estudo multicentro e internacional sugere que as pessoas portadoras de cĂąncer de mama triplo-negativo em estĂĄgio precoce, com nĂ­veis elevados de cĂ©lulas imunes dentro desses tumores, podem ter um baixo nĂ­vel de recorrĂȘncia e melhores taxas de sobrevivĂȘncia, mesmo quando nĂŁo houve tratamento com quimioterapia.

Released: 8-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Un nuevo estudio determina que los tumores de cåncer de mama triple negativo con un aumento de células inmunitarias presentan un menor riesgo de recurrencia después de la cirugía, incluso cuando no se tratan con quimioterapia
Mayo Clinic

Un nuevo estudio multicéntrico e internacional indica que las personas que tienen cåncer de mama triple negativo (TNBC) en etapa inicial y niveles elevados de células inmunitarias en sus tumores pueden tener un menor riesgo de recurrencia y mejores tasas de supervivencia, incluso cuando no se tratan con quimioterapia.

4-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Youths with Mood Disorders 30 Percent Less Likely to Acquire Driver’s License Than Peers
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers found that teens and young adults with mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder, were 30% less likely to obtain their driver’s license than peers without such disorders. Additionally, those youths with mood disorders experienced a slightly elevated risk of crashing.

4-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Radiation before mastectomy cuts time delays for reconstructive surgery in breast cancer patients
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that altering the sequence of breast cancer treatment to administer radiation before mastectomy allowed for concurrent breast reconstruction surgery, which reduced the number of operations required, minimized treatment delays and improved patient satisfaction.

2-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Nerve stimulation for sleep apnea is less effective for people with higher BMIs
Washington University in St. Louis

A sleep apnea treatment known as hypoglossal nerve stimulation is less effective in people with higher body mass indexes (BMIs), according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

2-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Feeding the lonely brain
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Study finds that lonely women experienced increased activation in regions of the brain associated with food cravings.

Newswise: Double Trouble: The Risks of Mixing Alcohol and Sports Wagering
Released: 2-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Double Trouble: The Risks of Mixing Alcohol and Sports Wagering
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV study finds binge drinking is disproportionately more common among sports bettors than non-gamblers or those who don't wager on sports.

28-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
New study finds triple-negative breast cancer tumors with an increase in immune cells have lower risk of recurrence after surgery
Mayo Clinic

A new multicenter, international study suggests that people who have early-stage triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and high levels of immune cells within their tumors may have a lower risk of recurrence and better survival rates even when not treated with chemotherapy.

1-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Chatbot outperformed physicians in clinical reasoning in head-to-head study
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

ChatGPT-4, an artificial intelligence program designed to understand and generate human-like text, outperformed internal medicine residents and attending physicians at two academic medical centers at processing medical data and demonstrating clinical reasoning. In a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine, physician-scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) compared a large language model’s (LLM) reasoning abilities directly against human performance using standards developed to assess physicians.

27-Mar-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Study provides a first look at oncologists' views on ethical implications of AI in cancer care
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In a survey of more than 200 U.S. oncologists, vast majority indicate that oncologists should be able to explain how AI works to their patients. Respondents say AI developers, more than oncologists or hospitals, have responsibility for legal issues arising from AI use in cancer care.

Newswise: Higher Genetic Risk of Obesity Means Working Out Harder for Same Results
26-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Higher Genetic Risk of Obesity Means Working Out Harder for Same Results
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Persons with a higher genetic risk of obesity need to work out harder than those of moderate or low genetic risk to avoid becoming obese, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) paper published in JAMA Network Open.

Newswise: Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Released: 26-Mar-2024 7:55 AM EDT
Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Indiana University

Black patients in need of a heart transplant may be less likely to receive one than white patients, according to a new study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers.

Released: 25-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Human brains are getting larger. That may be good news for dementia risk
UC Davis Health

A new study published in JAMA Neurology found human brains are getting bigger. The increased size may lead to a brain reserve, potentially reducing the risk of dementia.

20-Mar-2024 6:05 PM EDT
Most new doctors face some form of sexual harassment, even after #MeToo
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

More than half of all new doctors face some form of sexual harassment in their first year on the job, including nearly three-quarters of all new female doctors and a third of males, a new study finds.

Newswise: Inflammation-Reducing Drug Shows No Benefit for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Nih Trial
Released: 21-Mar-2024 11:30 AM EDT
Inflammation-Reducing Drug Shows No Benefit for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Nih Trial
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

The drug minocycline, an antibiotic that also decreases inflammation, failed to slow vision loss or expansion of geographic atrophy in people with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a phase II clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Dr. Nima Sharifi Pens JAMA Commentary on Prostate Cancer Variant His Team Identified
Released: 21-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Dr. Nima Sharifi Pens JAMA Commentary on Prostate Cancer Variant His Team Identified
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Desai Sethi Urology Institute (DSUI) Scientific Director Nima Sharifi, M.D., authored an invited commentary in JAMA Network Open related to a new Million Veteran Program study on the HSD3B1 genotype, an allele he helped discover more than 10 years ago.

Released: 20-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Experts warn climate change will fuel spread of infectious diseases
UC Davis Health

Infectious diseases specialists call the medical field to be ready to deal with the impact of climate change on spreading diseases, such as malaria, Valley fever, E-coli and Lyme disease.

20-Mar-2024 7:05 AM EDT
In Sickness and in Health, Older Couples Mostly Make Medicare Moves Together
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Older Americans who enroll in Medicare, or change their coverage, do so as individuals, even if they’re married or live with a partner. But a new study suggests the need for more efforts to help both members of a couple weigh and choose their options together.

19-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Researchers Report on the Effectiveness of Skin Biopsy to Detect Parkinson’s and Related Neurodegenerative Diseases
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) showed that a simple skin biopsy test detects an abnormal form of alpha-synuclein, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and the subgroup of neurodegenerative disorders known as synucleinopathies, at high positivity rates.

Newswise: Cleveland Clinic-Led Research Concludes Video Laryngoscopy is Most Effective Method for Intubating Patients Undergoing Surgical Procedures
Released: 18-Mar-2024 1:25 PM EDT
Cleveland Clinic-Led Research Concludes Video Laryngoscopy is Most Effective Method for Intubating Patients Undergoing Surgical Procedures
Cleveland Clinic

New Cleveland Clinic-led research provides evidence that video laryngoscopy significantly decreased the number of attempts needed to achieve intubation in adult surgical patients who required single-lumen endotracheal intubation for general anesthesia, compared with direct laryngoscopy. The research was published today in JAMA.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Five factors to ensure an infant thrives
Washington University in St. Louis

In new research published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis make the case that “thrive factors” are a key element of healthy human brain, behavioral and cognitive development.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 11:30 AM EDT
Study Estimates Nearly 70 Percent of Children Under Six in Chicago May Be Exposed to Lead-Contaminated Tap Water
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new analysis led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health estimates that 68 percent of Chicago children under age six live in households with tap water containing detectable levels of lead.

Released: 13-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Novel Oral Hormone Therapy Shows Promising Results for Prostate Cancer Treatment with Radiation Therapy
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

A high impact study led by Daniel Spratt, MD, Vincent K. Smith Chair in Radiation Oncology at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center demonstrates the safety and efficacy of a novel oral hormone therapy, relugolix, in conjunction with radiation therapy for treating men with localized and advanced prostate cancer. This work is published in JAMA Oncology.ï»ż

Released: 13-Mar-2024 8:20 AM EDT
Upcoming Solar Eclipse—Mount Sinai Ophthalmologists Warn About Dangers of Looking Directly at the Sun
Mount Sinai Health System

Warning follows Mount Sinai’s landmark eye damage case linked to the 2017 eclipse

Released: 12-Mar-2024 6:05 AM EDT
Same ER. Same patient. Different visit. Different race and ethnicity?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The effort to find and fight health disparities relies on data from millions of patients, including their race and ethnicity. But a new study finds the same patient might have different data recorded at separate ER visits.

9-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EST
BIDMC-led trial leads to FDA approval of coronary drug-coated balloons
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In the largest randomized clinical trial and first of its kind to date in the United States, a team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) assessed the efficacy and safety of using a drug-coated balloon in patients undergoing coronary angioplasty.

7-Mar-2024 1:30 PM EST
Medicaid eligibility during the pandemic led to increased postpartum coverage, study suggests
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Medicaid coverage has historically ended at 60 days postpartum, but according to new data, a significant number of maternal deaths are happening between 43 and 365 days postpartum.

Newswise: The Health Impacts of Migrating by Sea
Released: 7-Mar-2024 11:15 PM EST
The Health Impacts of Migrating by Sea
University of California San Diego

A new study of migrant drowning deaths in the Pacific Ocean lays the groundwork for future research.

Newswise: Weight loss and diabetes management drug linked to increased residual gastric content before anesthesia
4-Mar-2024 2:05 PM EST
Weight loss and diabetes management drug linked to increased residual gastric content before anesthesia
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Safety concerns for patients undergoing anesthesia who use glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs), which are medications approved for diabetes and weight management, were revealed in a UTHealth Houston study published today in JAMA Surgery.

29-Feb-2024 11:00 AM EST
Firearm Access and Gun Violence Exposure Are Common in Black and Native Communities
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A New Jersey Gun Violence Research Center study is the first to provide nationally representative data on gun use, storage and violence within Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) families.

 
Newswise: 1920_healing-gardens-plaza-cedars-sinai-2.jpg?10000
Released: 29-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
February Monthly Research Highlights Newsletter
Cedars-Sinai

A roundup of the latest medical discoveries and faculty news at Cedars-Sinai for February 2024.

Released: 28-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Risk of hospital readmission after surgery is high for older Americans
Yale University

A new Yale study finds an increased risk of hospital readmission for older Americans within 180 days of undergoing major surgery — a risk that is particularly acute for individuals who are frail or have dementia.

Newswise: 1920_alcoholic-beverages-cedars-sinai.jpg?10000
Released: 28-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Some Patients With Liver Disease May Tolerate Small Amounts of Alcohol Without Getting Sicker
Cedars-Sinai

Patients diagnosed with steatotic liver disease (formerly called fatty liver disease) are usually advised to stop drinking alcoholic beverages. But a new study led by Cedars-Sinai found that drinking, on average, a small amount of alcohol a day did not lead to further liver damage in patients with mild disease.

Newswise: New study links placental oxygen levels to fetal brain development
Released: 27-Feb-2024 7:05 PM EST
New study links placental oxygen levels to fetal brain development
University of Western Ontario (now Western University)

A new study shows oxygenation levels in the placenta, formed during the last three months of fetal development, are an important predictor of cortical growth (development of the outermost layer of the brain or cerebral cortex) and is likely a predictor of childhood cognition and behaviour.

Newswise: Study Shows Bariatric Surgery Provides Superior Long-Term Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Obesity
Released: 27-Feb-2024 12:00 PM EST
Study Shows Bariatric Surgery Provides Superior Long-Term Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Obesity
Cleveland Clinic

Research by Cleveland Clinic and three other U.S. medical centers has found that bariatric surgery provides better long-term control of blood glucose levels in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, compared with medical therapy.



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