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Newswise: Africa is no longer the carbon sink of the world
Released: 3-Apr-2024 3:00 PM EDT
Africa is no longer the carbon sink of the world
University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

In only nine years between 2010 and 2019, Africa has turned from being a net carbon sink, to being a net carbon source.

Newswise: Screen-Shot-2022-11-02-at-1.13.47-PM-e1697135887983.png
Released: 5-Mar-2024 4:55 PM EST
Building Financial Resilience in Africa to Address Labor Trafficking
School of Social Work, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Through a multi-institutional partnership funded by the U.S. Department of State, a new research partnership seeks to reduce vulnerability to labor trafficking by enabling youth and young adults to achieve financial security and stability at home.

19-Feb-2024 5:00 AM EST
Droughts may trigger HIV transmission increase among women in rural sub-Saharan Africa, study finds
University of Bristol

Droughts have the potential to increase the spread of HIV for women living in rural parts of Africa, researchers at the University of Bristol have found.

Newswise: WCS Joins Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi to Advance Conservation Efforts
Released: 14-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
WCS Joins Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi to Advance Conservation Efforts
Wildlife Conservation Society

The Wildlife Conservation Society was honored to be invited to participate in a high-level event today hosted by His Excellency Filipe Jacinto Nyusi, the President of the Republic of Mozambique, at Maputo National Park.

Newswise: Protected areas for elephants work best if they are connected
Released: 5-Jan-2024 3:05 PM EST
Protected areas for elephants work best if they are connected
Duke University

Conservation measures have successfully stopped declines in the African savanna elephant population across southern Africa, but the pattern varies locally, according to a new study.

Newswise: New study concludes finding cure for malaria may be even more challenging than thought
Released: 6-Dec-2023 12:05 PM EST
New study concludes finding cure for malaria may be even more challenging than thought
Case Western Reserve University

Researchers who have studied malaria for decades, hoping to find a cure, long thought they’d identified a type of blood that seemed to defend against the disease. But a new study published Dec. 5 in Cell Host & Microbe concludes that even some people with the protective blood type became infected. The question now is, “how?”

Newswise: New Agreement Provides Long-term Annual Funding to Protect Climate-Critical Madagascar Wilderness Area
Released: 28-Nov-2023 2:05 PM EST
New Agreement Provides Long-term Annual Funding to Protect Climate-Critical Madagascar Wilderness Area
Wildlife Conservation Society

Madagascar’s Makira-Masoala wilderness will receive an annual $1 million grant through a new agreement between the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Legacy Landscapes Fund (LLF), with support from Arcadia.

Released: 8-Nov-2023 5:05 PM EST
First evidence of how the Asian malaria mosquito is spreading drug-resistant malaria in Africa
Lancaster University

Asian malaria mosquito found to spread drug and diagnosis-resistant malaria in Africa.

Newswise: S&T professor’s glass powder that controls bleeding may also prevent infections
Released: 8-Nov-2023 3:05 PM EST
S&T professor’s glass powder that controls bleeding may also prevent infections
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Scientist to collaborate with South African researcher to test glass powder for antibacterial properties.

   
Released: 7-Nov-2023 10:05 AM EST
Why companies should report what CEOs and workers earn
University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Changes in the law will ensure that companies can’t go on ignoring inequalities in earnings and wealth in South Africa.

Newswise: Bouldering in South-Central Madagascar: A New “Rock-Climbing” Gecko Species of the Genus Paroedura
Released: 11-Oct-2023 1:35 PM EDT
Bouldering in South-Central Madagascar: A New “Rock-Climbing” Gecko Species of the Genus Paroedura
Pensoft Publishers

Named after its habitat preference, Paroedura manongavato, from the Malagasy words “manonga” (to climb) and “vato” (rock), is a bouldering expert. Part of its “home range” is also very well-known to rock climbers for its massive granitic domes.

Released: 11-Oct-2023 9:45 AM EDT
The 2023 Ameri Prize Recognizes Innovative Use of Artificial Intelligence at the U.S. Embassy in Guinea
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

The USC Center on Public Diplomacy (CPD) announced the 2023 recipient of the Ameri Prize for Innovation in Public Diplomacy.

Released: 11-Oct-2023 9:05 AM EDT
$7.3M Grant to Expand Wheat Pathogen Surveillance
Cornell University

One of the world’s largest crop pathogen surveillance systems is set to expand its capacity to protect wheat productivity in food vulnerable areas of East Africa and South Asia.

Newswise: Poor infrastructure and rising sea levels exacerbated flooding in Libya, says expert
Released: 13-Sep-2023 11:55 AM EDT
Poor infrastructure and rising sea levels exacerbated flooding in Libya, says expert
Virginia Tech

Thousands of people are dead and at least 10,000 missing after devastating flooding in Libya. The Mediterranean storm brought heavy rains to the northeastern part of the country, already crumbling from more than a decade of conflict.   “Although Storm Daniel caused the devastating flood, a combination of factors exacerbated the nation's vulnerability to natural hazards, resulting in enormous casualties,” says Virginia Tech geophysicist Manoochehr Shirzaei.

Released: 29-Aug-2023 8:05 AM EDT
Extreme weather events linked to increased child marriage
Ohio State University

Among the negative impacts of extreme weather events around the world is one that most people may not think of: an increase in child marriages.

Released: 24-Aug-2023 6:05 AM EDT
The swan song of African hydropower?
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

The attractiveness of new hydropower is decreasing fast, both due to the increasing economic competitiveness of solar panels and to the increasingly uncertain effects of climate change on river flows.

Released: 23-Aug-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Solar powered irrigation: a game-changer for small-scale farms in sub-Saharan Africa
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

A new study, published in Environmental Research Letters, finds that standalone solar photovoltaic irrigation systems have the potential to meet more than a third of the water needs for crops in small-scale farms across sub-Saharan Africa.

Newswise: Rutgers Scientist’s Research Provides Insight Into COVID-19 Immunity
Released: 17-Aug-2023 1:50 PM EDT
Rutgers Scientist’s Research Provides Insight Into COVID-19 Immunity
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Exposure to common cold-causing coronaviruses may contribute to pre-existing immunity to COVID-19, according to a new study involving a Rutgers research scientist.

Newswise:Video Embedded gender-based-research-project-provides-african-women-farmers-with-access-to-livestock-vaccines
VIDEO
Released: 17-Aug-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Gender-Based Research Project Provides African Women Farmers with Access to Livestock Vaccines
Tufts University

Before they had access to livestock vaccines, many women in rural parts of Africa who manage livestock had to resort to traditional medicines when their animals got sick, or suffer loss of their animals.

Released: 17-Aug-2023 10:00 AM EDT
Moffitt Awarded $5.5 Million to Study Virus-Associated Tumors Among Those Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa
Moffitt Cancer Center

The Center for Immunization and Infection Research in Cancer at Moffitt Cancer Center is expanding its viral infection research in Africa. The cancer center has received a $5.5 million, five-year specialized research center grant (U54CA277834) from the National Cancer Institute to investigate virus-associated tumors that disproportionately impact men and women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Released: 14-Aug-2023 5:30 PM EDT
How did South African healthcare workers cope during the pandemic?
University of California, Berkeley

A new study by UC Berkeley Anthropology Professor Andrew Wooyoung Kim reveals resilient coping mechanisms used by healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in metro Johannesburg, South Africa.

Released: 14-Aug-2023 1:05 PM EDT
New research offers solutions to improve drinking water access in developing countries
University of Notre Dame

New research from Alfonso Pedraza-Martinez, Professor of IT, Analytics and Operations in the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, examines the critical problem of drinking water access in rural areas of developing countries and recommends optimal locations to build new water projects.

Released: 14-Aug-2023 10:45 AM EDT
Death tolls from climate disasters will ‘balloon’ without investment in Africa’s weather stations
University of Cambridge

The climate crisis is increasing the frequency and intensity of floods, droughts and heatwaves, with Africa expected to be among the global regions hit hardest.

Released: 9-Aug-2023 3:45 PM EDT
Then vs. now: Did the Horn of Africa reach a drought tipping point 11,700 years ago?
Utrecht University

‘Wet gets wetter, dry gets drier’. That mantra has been used for decennia to predict how global warming will affect the hydrological cycle in different world regions.

Newswise: Kordofan giraffes face local extinction if poaching continues
Released: 4-Aug-2023 8:55 AM EDT
Kordofan giraffes face local extinction if poaching continues
University of Bristol

Poaching of two Critically Endangered Kordofan giraffes per year could result in extinction in just 15 years within Cameroon’s Bénoué National Park without intervention. These are the alarming new findings of a University of Bristol and Bristol Zoological Society-led study published in the African Journal of Ecology.

Released: 20-Jul-2023 3:35 PM EDT
The malnutrition paradox: Adolescent obesity in Zimbabwe
Osaka Metropolitan University

In some African countries that have traditionally faced issues such as undernourishment and hunger, being overweight is perceived as a good sign of health and prosperity.

Released: 18-Jul-2023 2:30 PM EDT
Study Offers Guidance for Improving Access to Oncology Drug Treatments in Sub-Saharan Africa
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Botswana-Rutgers Partnership for Health researchers review treatments that could improve outcomes for patients in a region where cancer rates are rising significantly.

Released: 17-Jul-2023 10:40 AM EDT
Apple snail invasion could be “disastrous” for rice production and food security in Kenya, study reveals
Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI)

An invasion of apple snail could be “disastrous” for rice production and food security in Kenya as well as other rice growing regions across Africa, according to a new CABI-led study published in the journal Pest Management Science.

Newswise: Sylvester Researchers, Collaborators Seek Answers to Prostate, Breast Cancer Among People of African Ancestry
Released: 10-Jul-2023 10:30 PM EDT
Sylvester Researchers, Collaborators Seek Answers to Prostate, Breast Cancer Among People of African Ancestry
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cancer Disparities: A new African Cancer Genome Registry at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in Miami seeks to find reasons for higher prostate and breast cancer rates in people of African ancestry. Dr. Sophia George, co-principal investigator, is available for interviews, as are two breast and prostate cancer study participants.

Released: 5-Jul-2023 6:45 PM EDT
Kenyan hospital visits linked to increased exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Washington State University

Kenyan patients who spend more than three days in the nation’s hospitals are more likely to harbor a form of bacteria resistant to one of the most widely used antibiotic classes, according to a recent study led by Washington State University.

Newswise: New Genetic Technology Developed to Halt Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes
Released: 5-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
New Genetic Technology Developed to Halt Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes
University of California San Diego

Using CRISPR technology, scientists have engineered a new way to genetically suppress populations of Anopheles gambiae, the mosquitoes that primarily spread malaria in Africa and contribute to economic poverty in affected regions.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded knowledge-powerhouses-urged-to-join-pioneering-africa-led-mission-to-level-up-global-research-and-restore-africa-s-rightful-place
VIDEO
28-Jun-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Knowledge powerhouses urged to join pioneering Africa-led mission to level up global research and restore Africa’s rightful place
University of Bristol

Global institutions are today being called on to back a bold, transformative plan for Africa to take its rightful role in research alliances, driving forward social justice, advancing science, and supercharging global scholarship.

Newswise: Africa's plans for improving epilepsy care: Action Amos
Released: 3-Jul-2023 11:50 AM EDT
Africa's plans for improving epilepsy care: Action Amos
International League Against Epilepsy

ILAE spoke with Action Amos about plans and strategies for improving epilepsy care across Africa. Leveraged by the Intersectoral Global Action Plan on epilepsy and other neurological disorders (IGAP), four "trendsetter" countries are taking a variety of approaches to engage governments and ensure the participation of people with epilepsy in all of their initiatives.

Released: 19-Jun-2023 12:05 PM EDT
A holistic approach to addressing food security in Africa
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

New research by an international team of researchers sheds light on the challenges and opportunities facing the African continent in securing sufficient food supplies with a particular focus on rice.

   
Newswise: In
Released: 12-Jun-2023 7:50 PM EDT
In "Science": Plant ecology study shows dominant influence of climate on vegetation
Universität Bayreuth

For several years, ecological research has argued that climate often has no determining influence on the distribution of forests and savannas in tropical regions. However, an international research team led by Prof. Dr. Steven Higgins at the University of Bayreuth has now succeeded in proving that it depends mostly on climatic factors whether regions in Africa are covered by forest or savanna. The study, published in "Science", thus confirms the dominant role of climate in the formation of global vegetation patterns.

Released: 12-Jun-2023 6:50 PM EDT
Climate Change: Rising Rainfall, not Temperatures, Threaten Giraffe Survival
University of Zurich

Climate change is expected to cause widespread decline in wildlife populations worldwide. But little was previously known about the combined effects of climate change and human activity on the survival rates not only of giraffes, but of any large African herbivore species. Now researchers from the University of Zurich and Pennsylvania State University have concluded a decade-long study – the largest to date – of a giraffe population in the Tarangire region of Tanzania.

Released: 9-Jun-2023 2:05 PM EDT
UNC Researchers Receive NIH Grant to Study Drug-Resistant Malaria in Ethiopia
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This study is expected to generate critical evidence about the rise and expansion of drug-resistant parasites in Ethiopia. Results will help policymakers and advance malaria elimination efforts in Ethiopia and beyond.

Newswise: Ancient genomes show that the farming lifestyle in northwestern Africa was ignited by oversea-migrants from Iberia 7,400 years ago
Released: 7-Jun-2023 7:50 PM EDT
Ancient genomes show that the farming lifestyle in northwestern Africa was ignited by oversea-migrants from Iberia 7,400 years ago
Uppsala University

A genomic analysis of ancient human remains from Morocco in northwest Africa revealed that food production was introduced by Neolithic European and Levantine migrants and then adopted by local groups.

Released: 6-Jun-2023 3:40 PM EDT
Team develops smartphone app to enhance midwifery care in Tanzania
Hiroshima University

An international research team from Tanzania and Japan created a smartphone app and conducted a pilot study of how the app might be used to improve midwives’ knowledge and skills in Tanzania. Their study focused on the app’s potential effects on the learning outcomes of midwives and birth preparedness of pregnant women in Tanzania.

Newswise: New study sheds light on complex genetics of autism in East African families
Released: 22-May-2023 12:25 PM EDT
New study sheds light on complex genetics of autism in East African families
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified hundreds of genomic variants associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in East African families who have a markedly higher prevalence of the neurodevelopmental condition than other populations worldwide. The study, published in Cell Genomics, is the first to investigate the genetics of ASD in an African population, an important step toward decreasing racial and ethnic health disparities for this condition, the authors said.

Newswise: World-Renowned Paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey To Be Honored at Week-Long Conference at Stony Brook University
Released: 18-May-2023 2:30 PM EDT
World-Renowned Paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey To Be Honored at Week-Long Conference at Stony Brook University
Stony Brook University

Stony Brook University will honor the life and legacy of eminent paleoanthropologist, conservationist and politician Richard E. Leakey by hosting “Africa: The Human Cradle: An International Conference Paying Tribute to Richard E. Leakey” from June 5 - 9, 2023 at the university’s Charles B. Wang Center. The Turkana Basin Institute (TBI) and Stony Brook are hosting the conference, in partnership with the National Geographic Society. Thought leaders from around the world will celebrate the immeasurable, life-long contributions by Leakey to furthering the appreciation of Africa’s centrality in the narrative of human evolution.

Released: 15-May-2023 1:05 PM EDT
Socio-economic development on the West African coast is a key factor for increasing flood risks
Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD)

Anthropogenic factors on the West African coast are contributing more than global climate change to the rapid increase in vulnerability and flood risks in the region.

Newswise: Using urine to make sub-Saharan city region food systems more sustainable
Released: 12-May-2023 3:50 PM EDT
Using urine to make sub-Saharan city region food systems more sustainable
Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD)

To give the authorities a cross-sectoral view of a city’s nutrient sink status, the researchers identified and analysed a range of waste flows. Their approach distinguished four nested spatial levels: the urban area; the potential territorial recycling system; the country and the international level. Based on that analysis, the researchers focused on the origin and fate of those nutrient-containing waste flows.

Released: 10-May-2023 8:00 AM EDT
Rutgers Experts Aim to Uncover Barriers to Conducting HIV Research in Africa
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Rutgers Institute for Health researcher, Dr. Ashley Grosso, receives grant from NIH to conduct study on barriers to HIV research in Africa.

Released: 5-May-2023 6:55 PM EDT
Uganda’s anti-homosexuality bill threatens HIV progress
SciDev.Net

Uganda’s anti-homosexuality bill, if signed into law, could lead to the withdrawal of foreign aid and threaten goals to end HIV/AIDS by 2030, advocates warn.

   
Newswise: Can ET detect us?
Released: 2-May-2023 6:20 PM EDT
Can ET detect us?
SETI Institute

A team of researchers from Mauritius and Manchester University has used crowd-sourced data to simulate radio leakage from mobile towers and predict what an alien civilization might detect from various nearby stars, including Barnard's star, six light years away from Earth.


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